Ćwiczenia online

matura z języka angielskiego 2012

Matura 2012

Zadanie 9. (3 pkt)
Przeczytaj tekst. Z podanych odpowiedzi wybierz właściwą, tak aby otrzymać logiczny i gramatycznie poprawny tekst. Zakreśl literę A, B, C albo D. Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 0,5 punktu.

AUSTRALIAN WILDLIFE

Australia is famous for its dangerous fauna. It is home to the world’s 10 most dangerous snakes, a variety of 9.1. ______ spiders, enormous crocodiles and huge flightless birds – ostriches or cassowaries – that can apparently knock a man down with one kick.

However, these species don’t show off their life-threatening abilities. The inland taipan is the most dangerous snake on the planet, yet nobody has ever died from its bite. The saltwater crocodile is the world’s largest reptile, with males growing up to seven metres 9.2. ______ length, yet fatal attacks on humans occur less than once per year. Funnel-web spiders are certainly poisonous, but claim fewer than one victim a year. 9.3. ______ are cassowaries met, let alone seen assaulting anyone.

9.4. ______, almost every Australian animal described as dangerous is actually shy and retiring. Mosquitoes are the obvious exception – nevertheless, malaria 9.5. ______ in Australia, and mosquito-borne diseases probably kill as few as five people a year. The most dangerous animal in Australia is probably the human. About 19 million of them 9.6. ______ here, and they are particularly dangerous behind the wheel of a car – 1,600 people are killed and 22,000 injured in traffic accidents every year. The bush is the safest
place to be.

adapted from Wildlife, June 2010

9.1. A. mortal B. fatal C. deadly D. terminal

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9.2. A. to B. in C. on D. at

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9.3. A. Rarely B. Either C. Not only D. Only then

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9.4. A. Apart from that fact B. On the surface C. In spite of that D. All in all

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9.5. A. has eradicated B. has to eradicate C. has been eradicated D. has had it eradicated

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9.6. A. reside B. occupy C. populate D. accommodate

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Matura 2012

Zadanie 8. (4 pkt)
Przeczytaj tekst, z którego usunięto cztery zdania. Dobierz brakujące zdania, tak aby otrzymać logiczny i spójny tekst. W każdą lukę (8.1.–8.4.) wpisz literę, którą oznaczone jest brakujące zdanie (A–F). Uwaga: dwa zdania zostały podane dodatkowo i nie pasują do tekstu. Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 1 punkt.

TIME MANAGEMENT

A Cambridge University tutor once said he was looking for two things in prospective students. What he wanted was intellect and besides that an ability to manage time. This coupling of intellect and time management may strike you as an odd pairing of the old and the new. 8.1. _____ The hours and minutes ticked away and you could either spend them wisely in the library, where they sometimes dragged a bit, or less wisely with friends, and then they skipped ahead.

But now we are hypnotized by time. 8.2. _____ We live longer, we work fewer hours than we did a hundred years ago, and thanks to hoovers and microwaves, we can carry out our chores very quickly. We should have plenty of time left to enjoy a slow, peaceful life. Yet, like most people, rather than have a quiet breakfast with the family, I eat my sandwiches over the keyboard while I check my e-mails.

According to a number of new books on time management, the answer is to slow down. Dr Edward Hallowell argues that we are now running so fast on our hamster wheels that we have lost sight of the things that really matter. But would slowing down really make things better? In my view, the pressure of time is usually a force for good. 8.3. _____ Though I often complain about being too busy, the truth is that I find it quite exciting.

Man has always worried about life being too fast, even when it was going at a speed that we would now regard as a snail’s pace. So what is our problem with time? The answer isn’t to go on a time management course and be taught how to make lists of priorities. 8.4. _____ In his bestseller Time: A User’s Guide, Stefan Klein suggests something different, that we develop a new culture of time, that we work in a rhythm that suits us.

adapted from www.bbc.co.uk

A. What is so odd is that we actually have more time than we’ve ever had before.
B. After a day or two of best behaviour we go back to our old ways – only worse, as we feel like failures.
C. As a first step to regaining control over time he suggests we should take off ourwatches and sit for half an hour doing nothing.
D. When I was a student, it didn’t occur to me that time was something that I could manage.
E. After what seemed like an eternity, I cracked and asked myself: ‘Do I really need to be doing this?’
F. It encourages us to get things done – and getting things done is surely satisfying.

W lukę 8.1. należy wstawić zdanie:

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W lukę 8.2. należy wstawić zdanie:

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W lukę 8.3. należy wstawić zdanie:

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W lukę 8.4. należy wstawić zdanie:

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Matura 2012

Zadanie 7. (5 pkt)
Przeczytaj tekst. Z podanych odpowiedzi wybierz właściwą, zgodną z treścią tekstu. Zakreśl literę A, B, C albo D. Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 1 punkt.

THE LUNCHEON

I caught sight of her at the play at the theatre, and in answer to her beckoning, I went over during the interval and sat down beside her. For some time I just listened to the animated discussion she and her companions were having. It was long since I had last seen her, and if someone had not mentioned her name, I hardly think I would have recalled seeing her before. She was so large. She addressed me brightly.
‘Well, it’s many years since we first met. Do you remember the first time I saw you? You asked me to luncheon.’ Did I remember?
It was twenty years ago and I was living in Paris. I had a tiny apartment in the Latin Quarter overlooking a cemetery, and I was earning very little money. She had read a book of mine and had written to me about it. I answered, thanking her, and presently I received from her another letter saying that she was passing through Paris and would like to have a chat with me; but the only free moment she had was on the following Thursday and would I give her a little luncheon at Foyot’s? Foyot’s is a restaurant at which the French senators eat, and it was so far beyond my means that I had never thought of going there. But I was flattered so I answered that I would meet her on Thursday at half past twelve.
I was surprised when the menu was brought, for the prices were a great deal higher than I had anticipated. But she reassured me.
‘I never eat anything for luncheon,’ she said.
‘Oh, don’t say that!’ I answered generously.
‘I never eat more than one thing. I wonder if they have any salmon.’
Well, it was early in the year for salmon, but I asked the waiter if there was any.
Yes, a beautiful salmon had just come in. I ordered it for my guest. The waiter asked her if she would have something while it was being cooked.
‘No,’ she answered, ‘I never eat more than one thing unless you have a little caviare.’ My heart sank. I knew I could not afford caviare, but I could not tell her that. I asked the waiter to bring caviare. For myself I chose the cheapest dish on the menu – a mutton chop.
‘I think you are unwise to eat meat,’ she said. ‘I don’t know how you can expect to work after eating such heavy things. I don’t believe in overloading my stomach.’ She ate the caviare and she ate the salmon. She talked about art and literature and music. But I wondered what the bill would come to.
‘I see that you’re in the habit of eating a heavy luncheon. Why don’t you follow my example and just eat one thing? I’m sure you’d feel so much better for it.’
‘I am only going to eat one thing,’ I said.
The waiter came again. She waved him aside with an airy gesture.
‘No. No. I never eat anything for luncheon. Just a bite. I couldn’t possibly eat anything more unless they had some of those giant asparagus. I should be sorry to leave Paris without having some of them.’
A happy smile spread over the waiter’s face, and he assured me that they had some.
‘I’m not hungry,’ my guest sighed, ‘but if you insist, I don’t mind having some asparagus.’
I ordered them. While we waited, I started to panic. It was not a question of how much money I should have left over for the rest of the month, but whether I had enough to pay the bill. The asparagus appeared.
‘Coffee?’ I said when she had finished eating.
‘Yes, just an ice cream and coffee,’ she answered. I ordered coffee for myself and an ice cream and coffee for her.
‘You know, there’s one thing I thoroughly believe in,’ she said, as she ate the ice cream. ‘One should always get up from a meal feeling one could eat a little more.’
‘Are you still hungry?’ I asked faintly.
‘Oh, no, I’m not hungry; you see, I don’t eat luncheon. I was speaking for you.’
The bill came, and when I paid it I found that I could only afford to leave three francs for the service. Her eyes rested for an instant on the money I left for the waiter, and I knew that she thought me mean. But I had the whole month before me and not a penny in my pocket.
‘Follow my example,’ she said as we shook hands, ‘and never eat more than one thing.’
‘I’ll do better than that,’ I replied. ‘I’ll eat nothing for dinner tonight.’
‘Humorist!’ she cried, jumping into a cab, ‘you’re quite a humorist!’
But I have had my revenge at last. Today she weighs more than a hundred kilos.

adapted from The Luncheon by Somerset Maugham

7.1. When the man joined the woman during the interval,
A. he asked her to remind him where they had met.
B. she introduced somebody to him.
C. she was reluctant to speak to him.
D. he found it difficult to recognize her.

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7.2. The man decided to have lunch with the woman at Foyot’s because he
A. had always wanted to know what drew French senators there.
B. had no idea it was an expensive place.
C. felt pleased with the interest the woman had taken in him.
D. hoped to further his career prospects.

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7.3. Which is true about the meal the man and woman had?
A. The woman disapproved of the food the man ordered for himself.
B. The food the woman ordered was recommended by the waiter.
C. The man ordered for himself the two cheapest dishes on the menu.
D. Both the man and the woman rounded their meal off with a frozen dessert.

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7.4. After leaving three francs for the waiter, the man realised that the woman
A. had played a joke on him.
B. considered the tip inadequate.
C. regretted having eaten so much.
D. understood that he was penniless.

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7.5. The man realised he had had his revenge on the woman when
A. she said he was amusing.
B. they finished their lunch.
C. she drove away in a taxi.
D. he met her at the theatre.

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Matura 2012

Zadanie 6. (5 pkt)
Usłyszysz dwukrotnie wywiad z instruktorką jazdy samochodem. Z podanych odpowiedzi wybierz właściwą, zgodną z treścią nagrania. Zakreśl literę A, B, C albo D. Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 1 punkt.

TRANSKRYPCJA

Zadanie 6.
Interviewer: To find out what it’s like to be a female driving instructor, we spoke to Kathy. What made you decide to set up your own driving school, Kathy?
Kathy: It all started with my Dad who suggested one day that I should do an advanced driving test. I decided to have a go and I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the experience and how well I did. At that time I was a sales representative, selling pharmaceuticals all over the country and I was fed up with working really hard to make someone else rich. I wanted to be self-employed and do something at which I could be an expert and I thought that since I had done so well at the advanced driving test, I might set up a driving school. Some of my friends had complained about their driving lessons so I thought that there was a chance for me. My parents were a little cautious, but I was really determined to try.
Interviewer: And are you satisfied with your career choice?
Kathy: Very much so. It offers so much variety! I’m involved in many different activities. Apart from doing driver training for beginners, I teach driving instructors, give presentations on road safety in local schools and run a new project called “National Driver Improvement Scheme”. It’s a special course which helps drivers who have had a crash to improve their driving skills. Just today, I did 2 hours’ driving instructor training
and then I went to St Helens, 30 miles away, to coach on this improvement course. And tomorrow I go back to lessons in my school. So as you see, each day is different.
Interviewer: There’s been a lot of talk about accidents caused by teenagers. What’s your opinion about young drivers?
Kathy: I think we should be concentrating on parents because people start to learn to drive from the age of 2. They watch Mum and Dad and how Mum and Dad act in the car becomes acceptable behaviour for those children. When we, at the driving school, get them at 17, and start teaching them to drive, they seem to accept our remarks and usually act accordingly. But the effect is short-lived. The moment they’ve passed the test, they immediately go back to the way of driving they’ve been used to for years.
Interviewer: What’s unique about your driving school?
Kathy: We are all trained in customer service. What I say to the customer is “I will put you with Charlie and if you’re not satisfied with him for whatever reason, ring me up and we’ll swap over”. If that pupil swaps to another instructor, the instructors will talk to each other, so there’s a bit of continuity. However, a lot of learners are scared to change instructors because even if they’ve had a bad one they are not sure that the new one will
be better.
Interviewer: What plans do you have for the future of your business?
Kathy: Well, basically, I want to be not so much the biggest, as the best driving school in Merseyside. I am looking to expand, but it will be on a one-at-a-time basis. I want my instructors to be satisfied so they don’t want to leave. I want to ensure that they’re really busy, so I won’t take on anyone else unless I know I can provide a new instructor with enough work and also keep the old instructors busy. What’s most significant to me is giving pupils quality service so they follow the highway code, respect pedestrians and do not exceed the speed limit. It can’t be the matter of just passing the test.
Interviewer: Thanks Kathy, it’s been great talking with you.

adapted from www.femaledrivinginstructors.co.uk

6.1. Kathy decided to set up her own driving school because she
A. lost her job as a sales representative.
B. was advised by her father to do so.
C. had many self-employed friends.
D. wanted to be her own boss.

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6.2. As far as Kathy’s work is concerned, she
A. needs to improve her driving skills constantly.
B. refuses offers of work outside her home town.
C. trains drivers who were involved in a collision.
D. prefers not to work with beginner learners.

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6.3. In Kathy’s opinion, after passing the driving test young drivers
A. begin to correct the way their parents drive.
B. adopt previously observed patterns of driving.
C. do their best to imitate the skills of their driving instructors.
D. need many years to drive according to what they were taught.

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6.4. In Kathy’s driving school
A. learners swap instructors willingly.
B. she chooses an instructor for her learners.
C. learners are trained by a few instructors as a rule.
D. instructors lose their job if a learner is dissatisfied.

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6.5. With reference to the future of her company, Kathy’s priority is to
A. teach learners how to drive safely.
B. employ new, better-trained instructors.
C. see to the rapid expansion of the school.
D. increase the number of learners passing tests.

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Matura 2012

ROZUMIENIE SŁUCHANEGO TEKSTU

Zadanie 4. (5 pkt)
Usłyszysz dwukrotnie wypowiedź Marka na temat jego nowego stylu życia. Zaznacz znakiem X, które zdania są zgodne z treścią nagrania (T – True), a które nie (F – False). Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 1 punkt.

TRANSKRYPCJA

Zadanie 4.
Interviewer: In 2008, an economics graduate and former businessman gave up the one resource we all crave more of: money. The man I’m talking about is Mark Boyle, who is in the studio with us today. Mark, you must have been an ardent ecologist if you took up such a radical challenge.

To tell you the truth, at first, I wasn’t. In six years of studying economics, not once did I hear the word “ecology”. So, if it hadn’t been for the chance purchase of a video about Gandhi, the famous Indian leader, I’d probably have ended up earning a fine living in a very respectable job persuading Indian farmers to grow genetically modified food crops, or doing something equally meaningless. But Ghandi gave me one huge lesson, he taught me that to change the world we have to start with ourselves.

One of the first things I realised was that I was looking at the world in the same way a medical practitioner looks at a patient, seeing symptoms and wondering how to fight them, without any thought for the root cause of the illness. I came to the conclusion that primarily, it is money that is responsible for the damage we inflict on our planet. If we grew our own food, we wouldn’t waste a third of it as we do today. If we had to clean our own drinking water, we probably wouldn’t contaminate it. If we made our own tables and chairs, we wouldn’t throw them out the moment we changed the interior decor. Money enables us to buy more and more, and waste more and more and the consequences are disastrous for our planet.

So, to change the world I had to start with myself, which meant I’d have to give up cash. I made a list of everything I buy and tried to figure out which items I could get in another way. For toothpaste, for example, I use some seeds. Most of the year I eat my own crops. I get around on my old bike.

It’s true that everything takes more effort in a moneyless world. Washing clothes takes a couple of hours of scrubbing with hand-made soap. Even a cup of tea takes half an hour to make! But it’s all worth it because the feeling of liberation and connection with nature it has afforded me compensates for the minor inconveniences.

You might think it’s frustrating trying to socialise with no money especially if, like me, you grew up in Northern Ireland where it’s a show of manliness to invite your mates to the pub. But now I invite them back to my caravan instead to have homemade food around the campfire, and in the open air, it’s much more fun.

I’m often asked what I miss about my old world. What should I miss? Stress? Traffic jams? Bank statements? Utility bills? Definitely none of these.

adapted from www.guardian.co.uk

4.1. One of the jobs Mark did involved encouraging Indian farmers to produce genetically modified food.

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4.2. Mark considers money a major factor contributing to the pollution of the environment.

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4.3. Mark doesn’t mind doing time-consuming domestic chores.

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4.4. Living without money has ruined Mark’s social life.

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4.5. Mark is soon going to return to his previous lifestyle.

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Matura 2012

Zadanie 6. (7 pkt)
Przeczytaj tekst. Z podanych odpowiedzi wybierz właściwą, zgodną z treścią tekstu. Zakreśl literę A, B, C albo D. Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 1 punkt.

SIMON’S STORY

Malaria has been in the media a lot recently. After leaving hospital a few days ago Cheryl Cole gave an interview about catching the disease on her holiday trip to Africa and the weeks she spent in intensive care. And she is not the only star who has suffered from this disease. The same thing happened to Simon Reeve, the face of popular BBC programmes and a travel writer. The difference is that Cheryl Cole took antimalarial tablets, just like medical textbooks say you should, and Simon was simply careless.

When we visit Simon to listen to his story about malaria, he is still embarrassed to admit that catching the disease was totally his own fault. Simon has gone around the world three times visiting far-off exotic locations so he was well aware of the health risks when he travelled to Gabon, West Africa, a malaria hotspot, in 2006. Although he knew how dangerous the disease is, he still risked his life.

‘It happened while I was filming Equator,’ recalls Simon. ‘I was told I should start taking antimalarial tablets the day before I got to Africa and then every day while I was there.I bought them well in advance, but foolishly, in all the excitement, I didn’t pack them. Of course it was stupid of me, but I thought everything would be all right so I didn’t worry about it. I think I was bitten by a mosquito on the first day but I realized something was wrong several days later. We had finished our journey through Gabon and were going to the Democratic Republic of Congo the following day. Sophie, the director, Sam, the cameraman, and I went to have a pizza in a restaurant near our hotel with a couple of doctors from Germany who were working at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, one of the main malaria hospitals in Africa. Suddenly, during the meal I started to get muscle ache and felt sleepy so I went back to my room and went straight to bed. I woke up at 3 a.m. feeling very sick. But malaria didn’t come to my mind. We’d come from an area where lots of gorillas had the deadly Ebola virus and that was my biggest fear. The hospital was far away so I wanted to contact one of the German doctors but I didn’t have their phone numbers. I decided to wait until morning but I was really terrified.’

In the morning Simon managed to get up and perhaps rather optimistically tried to continue filming. ‘Sophie and Sam took one look at me and told me to sit down,’ he says. ‘They checked my temperature which was 39.8C – a high fever. They gave me some water and some medicine and called for a local doctor who examined me and said he suspected I had malaria. Sophie contacted one of the specialists we had met the day before and after giving me a blood test he said the diagnosis was correct.

I felt really embarrassed but the experience has taught me a lot. Now, I am a wiser traveller. I travel with a medical kit and I always check where I can get medical help. When everything is fine I go to the doctor only once every two or three years. But if I start to suffer from symptoms similar to flu, I go to my doctor straightaway to make sure the malaria hasn’t come back. It’s a huge change. Before I had malaria I didn’t even have my own doctor, I just took an aspirin when I had a cold.’

Simon really wants to reduce the number of malaria infections each year, that’s why he agreed to have his story published. ‘With modern medicine there is no reason so many British travellers should catch this horrible disease,’ he says.

adapted from www.dailymail.co.uk

6.1. Both Cheryl Cole and Simon Reeve
A. fell ill because they were careless.
B. worked on the same TV programme.
C. caught malaria while doing their job.
D. decided to talk about their illness in public.

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6.2. Simon blames himself for catching malaria because he
A. didn’t buy the tablets he needed.
B. took the tablets too late.
C. forgot to take the tablets.
D. packed the wrong tablets.

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6.3. Simon thinks he got infected
A. after his visit to the Albert Schweitzer Hospital.
B. in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
C. while having a pizza in a restaurant.
D. during his stay in Gabon.

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6.4. When Simon felt ill in his hotel room, he
A. thought he had caught a different disease.
B. asked German doctors for advice.
C. went to hospital right away.
D. was sure he had malaria.

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6.5. Who first took care of Simon in the morning?
A. a local doctor
B. his work colleagues
C. an unknown specialist
D. doctors from Germany

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6.6. Because of the fact that he once had malaria, Simon
A. consults a malaria specialist every year.
B. takes malaria medicines regularly.
C. cares about his health more.
D. gets the flu more often.

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6.7. In the article, the author
A. makes people more aware of a dangerous disease.
B. encourages readers to go to exotic countries.
C. tells the story of Simon’s successful career.
D. advertises a new BBC travel programme.

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Matura 2012

ROZUMIENIE PISANEGO TEKSTU

Zadanie 4. (7 pkt)
Przeczytaj tekst. Dobierz właściwy nagłówek (A–H) do każdego fragmentu tekstu. Wpisz odpowiednią literę w miejsca 4.1.–4.7. Uwaga: jeden nagłówek został podany dodatkowo i nie pasuje do żadnego fragmentu tekstu. Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 1 punkt.

A. WHAT READERS WISHED FOR
B. THE HISTORIC SENTENCE
C. A MONEY-MAKING LOCATION
D. WHAT IT IS ABOUT
E. THE TREASURE FOUND AT LAST
F. THE FIRST EDITION
G. WHY SO EXPENSIVE
H. SUCCESSFUL ADAPTATIONS

4.1.

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One day in 1929, when J. R. R. Tolkien was marking examination papers at Oxford University, he saw that a student had left an empty page. On it, Tolkien wrote the words, ‘In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.’ Right there, a book, a bestseller, and a legend were born.

4.2.

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Readers could finally buy The Hobbit in 1937. The book was illustrated with black and white drawings by Tolkien, who also designed the book cover. Thanks to enthusiastic reviews, the first 1,500 copies sold out very quickly.

4.3.

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Bilbo Baggins, the main character of the book, lives a peaceful life in his comfortable hole at Bag End. Bilbo is a hobbit – one of a race of small people. One day the old wizard Gandalf arrives and persuades Bilbo to go on an adventure with a group of thirteen dwarves. So begins their long and difficult search for the treasure hidden by the evil dragon Smaug.

4.4.

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In December 1937, The Hobbit’s publisher asked Tolkien to continue the story. In reply, Tolkien offered the first version of another story, but the editors did not accept it. The public wanted ‘more about hobbits’. Tolkien began work on The New Hobbit, which later became The Lord of the Rings.

4.5.

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The Hobbit has been on the market since 1937. After the book came a version for the theatre, then the radio, and different games. Some of these new products have received excellent reviews, including a video game that won the Golden Joystick Award.

4.6.

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The Hobbit is now being made into a film. The film’s final cost could be about twice as much as the whole of The Lord of the Rings trilogy. The film’s budget has increased because of years of delays which were caused by legal problems. The good news is that the first part of The Hobbit will be in cinemas in December 2012.

4.7.

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The two-part movie based on The Hobbit has been filmed in New Zealand. Making the films in this country provided work for thousands of New Zealanders. Probably, like The Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Hobbit will promote the country and bring profits for the tourist industry. Hundreds of local people protested against the possibility of moving The Hobbit elsewhere.

adapted from www.en.wikipedia.org

Zadanie 5. (6 pkt)
Przeczytaj tekst. Zaznacz znakiem X, które zdania są zgodne z treścią tekstu (T – True), a które nie (F – False). Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 1 punkt.

THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET

We did not always live on Mango Street. Before that we lived on Loomis on the third floor, and before that we lived on Keller. Before Keller it was Paulina, and before that I can’t remember. But what I remember most was moving a lot. Each time it seemed there’d be one more of us. By the time we got to Mango Street we were six – Mama, Papa, Carlos, Kiki, my sister Nenny, and me.
The house on Mango Street is ours and we don’t have to pay rent to anybody, or share the yard with the people downstairs, or be careful not to make too much noise and there isn’t a landlord banging on the ceiling with a broom. But even so, it’s not the house we’d thought we’d get.
Our parents always told us that one day we would move into a house, a real house that would be ours for always so we wouldn’t have to move each year. Our house would be white with trees around it and a big yard and grass growing without a fence. It would be within town limits but it would look like a big country house. And our house would have running water and pipes that worked. And we’d have a basement and at least three bathrooms so when we took a bath we wouldn’t have to tell everybody. This was the house Papa talked about when he held a lottery ticket and this was the house Mama dreamed up in the stories she told us before we went to bed.
But Papa’s tickets were never the lucky ones and the house on Mango Street is not the way they told it at all. It’s small and red with tight little steps in front and windows so small you’d think they were holding their breath. And the house has only one bathroom, very small.
Once, when we were living on Loomis, a teacher from my school passed by and saw me playing outside.
‘Where do you live?’ she asked.
‘There,’ I said, pointing up to the third floor.
‘You live there?’
There. I had to look to where she pointed – the third floor, with the paint peeling, and the wooden bars Papa had nailed on the windows so we wouldn’t fall out. You live there? The way she said it made me feel like nothing. There. I lived there. I nodded.
I knew then I had to have a house. A real house. One I could point to. But this isn’t it. The house on Mango Street isn’t it. ‘For the time being,’ Mama said. ‘Temporary,’ said Papa. But I’ve stopped really counting on it. I know how those things go. adapted from The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

5.1. The family had grown by the time they moved to Mango Street.

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5.2. The house on Mango Street belongs to the narrator’s family.

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5.3. The family dreamt of living in the country.

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5.4. The family moved to Mango Street because the father had won a lottery.

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5.5. The narrator felt ashamed at the end of the conversation with the teacher.

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5.6. The narrator believes her parents’ promises of a better place to live after Mango Street.

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Matura 2012

ROZUMIENIE SŁUCHANEGO TEKSTU

Zadanie 1. (5 pkt)
Usłyszysz dwukrotnie wywiad z reżyserką filmów dokumentalnych. Zaznacz znakiem X, które zdania są zgodne z treścią nagrania (T – True), a które nie (F – False). Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 1 punkt.

TRANSKRYPCJA

[spoiler]

Zadanie 1.
Journalist: Today we’re talking to Sarah Robertson, a film maker and director of the movie Arctic Tale. How did you get into the film industry, Sarah?
Sarah: My friends and I were underwater photographers and we wanted to find a place which would be really interesting. The Arctic had so many mysteries and little-known animals. We were young and poor, but we had a camera. We went to the north of the Arctic and started taking pictures and learning about the place and animals. Then, four years later, some TV broadcasters asked us to make wildlife films, and we started making them. Directing them was great! They are often shown on Discovery Channel.
Journalist: Then you got interested in global warming and made Arctic Tale. Could you tell me something about the film?
Sarah: We’ve been working in the Arctic for fifteen years and we’ve seen many changes. We are impressed by the way animals adapt to the new, changing conditions. The film Arctic Tale presents their intelligence and courage. It shows how they find new ways to live.
Journalist: What were some of the biggest problems you had while you were filming?
Sarah: Making films in the Arctic is very difficult. For every week you are in the Arctic you get three to four good days of filming. Although it’s really cold and conditions are extreme, it’s actually the waiting that becomes the hardest part of working there. You never know when something is going to happen and you have to be ready at all times.
Journalist: What advice do you have for people who are interested in working in the film industry?
Sarah: Take a camera and just start filming. Don’t let anyone say you can’t do it.
Journalist: Thank you for your time, Sarah.

adapted from www.amazing-kids.org

[/spoiler]

1.1. Sarah first went to the Arctic to make a film for TV.

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1.2. Sarah made some wildlife films before filming Arctic Tale.

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1.3. Arctic Tale is about changes in animals’ living habits.

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1.4. Low temperatures are the main problem for film makers in the Arctic.

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1.5. In the interview, Sarah presents her views on global warming.

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Zadanie 2. (5 pkt)
Usłyszysz dwukrotnie pięć wiadomości. Do każdej wiadomości (2.1.–2.5.) dopasuj nagłówek podsumowujący jej treść (A–F). Wpisz rozwiązania do tabeli. Uwaga: jeden nagłówek został podany dodatkowo i nie pasuje do żadnej wiadomości. Za każde poprawne rozwiązanie otrzymasz 1 punkt.

TRANSKRYPCJA

[spoiler]

Zadanie 2.
And here’s some latest news from around the world.

One
A musician travelling on a train from Cardiff called the police yesterday saying that someone had stolen his expensive violin. When the police stopped the train to catch the thief they saw the violin under the musician’s seat! The man was coming back from a concert, fell asleep during the journey and forgot to take it with him when he was getting off the train. The violin was made in Italy in 1748 and is worth about a million euros.

Two
Two hundred passengers travelling on a ferry from Ireland found themselves in trouble last night when it caught fire over 20 miles off the Irish coast. The crew of a ship passing by saved everybody on board and transported them back to Ireland. Fifteen passengers were taken to hospital but their lives are not in danger. The police are going to question the owner of the company because the ferry was quite old and in need of repair.

Three
A man who broke into a luxurious apartment was trapped in a lift for 11 hours. When the lift stopped between floors, the man tried to open the door with a screwdriver. But the lift had a special lock which closed him inside. The man panicked and set off the fire alarm. The fire brigade and the police arrived within a few minutes but it took the specialists a few hours to rescue the man from the lift. And then they locked him up again, this time in prison.

Four
The Royal Navy’s newest submarine hit some rocks near the Isle of Skye. It happened yesterday in the evening while the ship was doing some sea tests. Luckily, no-one on board was hurt but some systems are not working properly. The submarine is the Royal Navy’s most technologically advanced ship. After the necessary repairs the ship will return to port for a closer inspection.

Five
Some city centres have become dangerous areas, but in Wellington, New Zealand, they have found a way to reduce crime. Soft, classical music coming out of speakers, has made the number of criminal incidents fall from 86 a week to 4 a week. People feel much safer and the young don’t get into trouble so often now. If it works, other cities could consider using the same idea.

adapted from various sources

[/spoiler]

A. CRIMINAL IN TROUBLE
B. FIRE ALARM ON TRAIN
C. ANTI-CRIME MUSIC
D. MODERN SHIP DAMAGED
E. MUSICAL INSTRUMENT FOUND
F. PEOPLE SAVED FROM BURNING BOAT

Do wiadomości 2.1 pasuje nagłówek:

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Do wiadomości 2.2 pasuje nagłówek:

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Do wiadomości 2.3 pasuje nagłówek:

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Do wiadomości 2.4 pasuje nagłówek:

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Do wiadomości 2.5 pasuje nagłówek:

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Roman Rzadkowski - autor