matura 2006 jar

WYPOWIEDŹ PISEMNA

Zadanie 17. (18 pkt)
Wypowiedz się na jeden z trzech poniższych tematów. Wypowiedź powinna zawierać od 200 do 250 słów i spełniać wszystkie wymogi typowe dla formy wskazanej w poleceniu. Zaznacz temat, który wybrałeś/aś, zakreślając jego numer.

1. Napisz recenzję Twojego ulubionego anglojęzycznego czasopisma. Uzasadnij swój wybór, podkreślając jego przydatność w nauce języka angielskiego.

PRZYKŁADY Z ARKUSZA CKE

If you have a bit of money to spare, it is worth treating yourself to a copy of the world-famous magazine – National Geographic. It is brought out every
month in over 30 countries and has a circulation of around 5 million copies. Although it is available also in Polish, I would recommend the English version which can provide a really inspiring and pleasurable way of improving your English.

National Geographic is renowned for its breathtaking photography. You will probably spend hours just pouring over the colourful images, but if you start to read through the accompanying articles, you will find them equally fascinating. The articles appearing in the magazine are richly varied – ranging from wildlife and archaeology to culture and astronomy – so anyone with a natural curiosity for the world around us will find something of interest.
Reading this magazine is also an excellent way of widening your vocabulary and improving your written style. It contains journalism of the highest class by some of the best authors, so apart from presenting inviting material, it lets you discover the beauty of the language, which will inspire you to learn more.

I can thoroughly recommend this magazine to all learners of English – reading is challenging but well worth the effort. Not only will you improve your
language skills in this way, but you will also have something to talk about when you meet fellow-travellers on your numerous journeys.

2. Coraz mniej młodych ludzi decyduje się na zawarcie małżeństwa przed trzydziestym rokiem życia. Napisz rozprawkę przedstawiającą wady i zalety zakładania rodziny w późniejszym wieku.

These days young people have many more opportunities in life than the previous generations and the decision to start a family is often put off. Does it always make sense to postpone this step? Are you really better off marrying in your 30s or later?

Statistics warn against rushing into marriage and show that early marriages are much more likely to end in divorce than those taken later in life. Maturity and experience seem essential not only for a lasting relationship but also for raising children. Another important factor is financial stability. When you start a family, you want to be sure you can support it, and there is no doubt it is easier to attain a safe position at work when you are not restricted by domestic duties.

Yet, there are concerns that people who settle down too late may have problems starting a family. Generally, the longer people are free and single, the more reluctantly they give up this independence and decide to tie the knot. Even when they do, it may be more difficult for women to become pregnant, deliver a healthy baby and later cope with both domestic and professional duties, especially that grandparents are ageing and can’t serve as reliable baby-sitters.

To sum up, school leavers nowadays are unlikely to claim that their main ambition is to get married and have children, but when they have reached
the top and got tired of work, they might look with envy at those with a home and family already made.

3. Opisz wydarzenie sportowe, które zapamiętałeś/aś ze względu na dobre przygotowanie oraz szczególną atmosferę.

For many people the Wimbledon Championships, just like cricket, 5 o’clock tea and the Oxford-Cambridge boat race, are a quintessentially English event,
in which you participate not because you are a keen tennis fan, but because you want to sample the unique atmosphere of this occasion. On arriving at Wimbledon tube station at the end of June, you may feel discouraged by the sight of the long queue stretching as far as the eye can see. However, it turns out that queuing is part of the whole event – people come prepared with books and magazines, they chat to each other in a friendly manner while vendors go up and down with drinks, newspapers and, of course, strawberries. The organization of queuing is quite impressive and soon you realize you are just a few steps from the ticket office.

Once inside, you are surrounded by the colours and sounds of Wimbledon – the pristine grass courts, world-class players in crisp white, the smooth tones of the umpires announcing the scores. Courts are clearly marked and having a standing ticket makes it possible to wander around and make the most of this experience. Though Centre Court is impressive, some people prefer the more intimate atmosphere of the smaller courts where you are able to see famous players close up.

The only disappointment for me was the unbelievable price of the strawberries, but this is a minor flaw in an otherwise perfectly run event the atmosphere of which you will never forget.

Matura 2006 z języka angielskiego r 13

Matura 2006

Zadanie 13. (4 pkt)
Przeczytaj poniższy tekst, z którego usunięto cztery zdania. Dobierz brakujące zdania (A-F), tak aby otrzymać logiczny i spójny tekst. W każdą lukę (13.1.-13.4.) wpisz literę, którą oznaczone jest brakujące zdanie. Dwa zdania podane zostały dodatkowo i nie pasują do tekstu. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz l punkt.

Yahoo, MSN, Altavista – do those names ring a bell? Even if you are not an internet addict they should sound familiar. They are examples of internet portals which were the driving force of the net in the second half of the 1990s. The theory was simple: giant websites needed to display lots of advertisements to make money. 13.1.____ The obvious way to do this was
to give users lots of reasons to stick around. So, both portals and search sites started to add various extra features like email, chat rooms or photo albums to attract viewers. As a result they had messy, feature-packed front pages where the search and directory functions had become smaller and harder to find.

Then, Google arrived, like a breath of fresh air. Its front page was, by contrast, clean and spacious, with a big search box that left users in no doubt about its function. Best of all, its search was noticeably faster and better than its main rivals. The company solved the advertising problem just as brilliantly. 13.2.____ These small text ads were targeted to the search each user was making, and could be as useful as the search results. Instead of reaching thousands of people who were not interested, the idea was to reach the handful who were.

But searching web text was not enough for Google. It started to search images and other documents; it also added a directory, mail order shopping catalogues, a news service and, most recently, books and scholarly papers. The company has also expanded into other areas, by creating new services or buying other companies. These include Google Answers, Picasa photo album, Keyhole satellite imagery, and a language translation service. No doubt there will be more to come. 13.3.____ Hence the need for Google Fusion, the service that could eventually bring most of the services together on a single portal page.

Overall the quality of individual services seems less important than the fact that there are so many of them. Google has gradually changed from a search company into a media firm, whether it’s willing to admit it or not. 13.4. _____ In this market, Google has taken its first baby steps, while the opposition is miles ahead.
adapted from: The Guardian, Portal Combat, 2005 A. Instead of selling mass-market ad banners that were boring and slowed pages, it created AdWords.

A. Instead of selling mass-market ad banners that were boring and slowed pages, it created AdWords.
B. To create the opportunity to show these banner ads, they had to attract and retain lots of “eyeballs”.
C. These clever methods of advertising made Google’s founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, billionaires.
D. However, despite the multitude of services owned by Google, some are poorly integrated with each other, or not integrated at all, so even regular users may not know they exist.
E. If it tackles this large market with the pace and skill it applied to search, it should do very well, but the future is not guaranteed.
F. Google is top in the world of web search and the attempt to become something more – a portal – is out of the question.

W lukę 13. 1 wstawisz zdanie:

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W lukę 13. 2 wstawisz zdanie:

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W lukę 13. 3 wstawisz zdanie:

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W lukę 13. 4 wstawisz zdanie:

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Zadanie 14. (3 pkt)
Przeczytaj poniższy tekst. Z podanych odpowiedzi wybierz właściwą, tak aby otrzymać logiczny i gramatycznie poprawny tekst. Zaznacz jedną z czterech możliwości, zakreślając literę A, B, C lub D. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz 0,5 punktu.

Cowboy hostility towards Native Americans – popularly known as Indians – is a myth of the Wild West. The myth 14.1. _____ because many of the best stories set good against evil, and cowboy films were 14.2. _____ exception. The heroes were the cowboys. Searching for villains, film directors and organizers of Wild West shows often selected Indians because their 14.3. _____ and tactics were good entertainment.

The truth was quite different. America’s westward expansion was marked by frequent fighting between immigrant and Native Americans, but cowboys were rarely involved. Real cowboys had 14.4. _____ reason to dislike the Indians. In fact, many cowboys were Native Americans. Excellent horsemanship, good local knowledge and the ability to survive in 14.5._____ conditions made them ideal cattlemen. No drover taking cattle through Indian territory wanted to make his difficult job still harder by 14.6. _____ up trouble with the local people. Real-life cowboys much preferred talking with Native Americans to fighting them. While on the trail, they often depended on Indian traders for fresh food and other supplies.

abridged from: The Knowledge Factory

14.1.
A. was rising
B. raised
C. arose
D. was raised

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14.2.
A. no
B. neither
C. none
D. not

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14.3.
A. view
B. outlook
C. expression
D. appearance

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14.4.
A. little
B. some
C. small
D. every

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14.5.
A. strange
B. tough
C. freak
D. heavy

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14.6.
A. keeping
B. setting
C. bringing
D. stirring

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Matura 2006 z języka angielskiego r 12

Matura 2006

ROZUMIENIE TEKSTU CZYTANEGO I ROZPOZNAWANIE STRUKTUR LEKSYKALNO-GRAMATYCZNYCH

Zadanie 12. (5 pkt)
Przeczytaj poniższy tekst. Na podstawie informacji w nim zawartych, z podanych możliwości odpowiedzi wybierz właściwą, zgodną z treścią tekstu. Zakreśl literę A, B, C lub D. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz 1 punkt.

Nicky was too young and inexperienced to beat any first-class tennis players in the Monte Carlo tournament, but he did not disgrace himself. He snatched an unexpected victory over a Spanish player and gave one of the Austrians a closer match than anyone had thought possible. In the mixed doubles he got into the semi-finals. His charm conquered everyone and he vastly enjoyed himself.

The tournament came to an end and the day following he was to fly back to London. Anxious to play his best he had lived very carefully, smoking little and drinking nothing, and going to bed early; but on his last evening he thought he would like to see something of the life in Monte Carlo, of which he had heard so much. An official dinner was given to the tennis-players and after dinner with the rest of them he went into the Sporting Club. It was the
first time he had been there. Monte Carlo was full and the rooms were crowded. Nicky had never before seen roulette played except in the pictures; he stopped at the first table he came to; chips of different sizes were scattered over the green cloth; the croupier gave the wheel a sharp turn and with a flick threw in the little white ball. After what seemed an endless time the ball stopped and another croupier with a broad, indifferent gesture raked in the chips of those who had lost.

Nicky stood for a while looking at the losers’ money being raked-in by the croupier and the money that was won paid out to the winners. It was impossible to deny that it was thrilling. It did seem silly to leave Monte without putting something on the table just once. It would be an experience, and at his age you had to have all the experience you could get. He reflected that he hadn’t promised his father not to gamble, he’d promised him not to forget his advice. It wasn’t quite the same, was it? He took a hundred-franc note out of his pocket and rather shyly put it on number eighteen. He chose it because that was his age. With a wildly beating heart he watched the wheel turn; the little white ball whizzed about like a small demon of mischief; the wheel went round more slowly, the little white ball hesitated, it seemed about to stop, it went on again; Nicky could hardly believe his eyes when it fell into number eighteen. A lot of chips were passed over to him and his hands trembled as he took them. It seemed to amount to a lot of money. He was so confused that he never thought of putting anything on the following round. He was really surprised when eighteen again came up. There was only one chip on it.
‘By George, you’ve won again,’ said a man who was standing near to him.
‘Me? I hadn’t got anything on.’
‘Yes, you had. Your original stake. They always leave it on unless you ask for it back. Didn’t you know?’
Another packet of chips was handed over to him. Nicky’s head reeled. He counted his gains: seven thousand francs. A queer sense of power seized him; he felt wonderfully clever. This was the easiest way of making money that he had ever heard of. abridged from: ‘The Facts of Life’ by W. Somerset Maugham The Penguin Book of British Comic Stories,

compiled by Patricia Craig

12.1. In the Monte Carlo tennis tournament Nicky
A. represented Austria.
B. played both singles and doubles.
C. won the semi-finals.
D. only played with second-class players.

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12.2. On the last night Nicky
A. attended a formal reception.
B. went to bed early before his return flight.
C. decided not to drink any alcohol.
D. left the official dinner before the other guests.

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12.3. When he watched the people playing roulette, he
A. found the game too exciting to resist.
B. felt silly, because he didn’t understand the game.
C. thought the promise he had made to his father was silly.
D. decided to experience gambling once again.

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12.4. When Nicky entered the game, he
A. intended to play until he lost one hundred francs.
B. wasn’t very excited because the stake was low.
C. bet on a number that was meaningful to him.
D. immediately won seven thousand francs.

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12.5. Nicky won in the second round because he
A. had decided to choose the same number.
B. had followed the advice of a man next to him.
C. had put more money on number 18.
D. didn’t fully know the rules of the game.

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Matura 2006 z języka angielskiego r 11

Matura 2006

Zadanie 11. (5 pkt)
Zapoznaj się z treścią zadania. Usłyszysz dwukrotnie wywiad z prezenterem telewizyjnym. Z podanych możliwości odpowiedzi wybierz właściwą, zgodną z treścią tekstu. Zakreśl literę A, B, C lub D. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz l punkt.

TRANSKRYPCJA

Zadanie 11.
Interviewer: Now let’s find out the answers to some of your questions. I’m going to quiz John Hammond, one of the forecasters in our team, on your behalf. What did you do before becoming a BBC broadcast meteorologist?
John Hammond: I studied for a Geography degree at Salford University, followed by a Masters in Meteorology at Birmingham University. On completing my Master of Science, I worked at regional weather centres in Nottingham, Bristol and Plymouth. This involved a variety of forecasting work for aviation, local industry, and some local radio too. However it wasn’t until the mid-1990s that I started TV weather presenting. I spent around 7 years as a Met Office forecaster at ITV, until joining the BBC Weather Centre in the spring of 2003.
Interviewer: Why did you want to be a broadcast meteorologist?
John Hammond: I think it’s the best job in the Met Office. If you’re interested in the weather and you like to show off, it’s the job for you!
Interviewer: What are the good things about your job?
John Hammond: No two days of weather are the same. So every day is a brand new adventure. It’s a great team at the Weather Centre and we manage to have a good laugh as well as doing the serious job of weather forecasting. Of course it’s also a privilege to be working in television, and occasionally meeting some famous people too.
Interviewer: Are there any drawbacks?
John Hammond: Well, the weather never sleeps. I mean, staying up all night is one thing, but presenting the weather to the nation at four in the morning is another. Thank goodness for make-up!
Interviewer: Do you get nervous before a broadcast?
John Hammond: I always get a little nervous before broadcasts, especially on a day when there’s lots of severe weather around. I find I need the nerves to keep my broadcast pacey and energetic.
Interviewer: Have you ever made any mistakes?
John Hammond: Most days!
Interviewer: When and why did you first get interested in weather?
John Hammond: I have been interested in the weather for as far back as I can remember. I used to watch every BBC bulletin when I was very little. I even wrote to the weatherman Bert Ford when I was about 4, asking for some tips for becoming a weatherman. Given where I’ve ended up, it must have been sound advice. I’m very lucky.

abridged from: www.bbc.co.uk/weather/bbcweather/forecasters/johnnammond

11.1. John Hammond got the first job connected with forecasting
A. in 2003.
B. in the mid-1990s.
C. after graduation.
D. 7 years ago.

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11.2. John believes that the job of a broadcast meteorologist
A. gives the chance to interview famous people.
B. suits people who like to attract attention.
C. requires a good sense of humour.
D. is sometimes serious and uninteresting.

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11.3. According to John the worst thing about his job is
A. having to forecast bad weather.
B. making numerous mistakes.
C. getting nervous before broadcasts.
D. having to work night-shifts.

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11.4. John remembers the BBC weatherman Bert Ford because he
A. got some handy hints from him.
B. received a bulletin from him.
C. had an opportunity to talk to him.
D. frequently wrote letters to him.

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11.5. During the interview John
A. encourages other people to follow a similar career path.
B. describes how complicated weather presenting is.
C. explains why the job is both appealing and stressful.
D. presents lucky coincidences influencing his career.

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Matura 2006 z języka angielskiego r 10

Matura 2006

Zadanie 10. (6 pkt)
Zapoznaj się z treścią zadania. Usłyszysz dwukrotnie wypowiedź na temat problemu zatłoczonych autostrad w Wielkiej Brytanii. Na podstawie usłyszanych informacji zdecyduj, które z podanych zdań są zgodne z treścią tekstu (TRUE), a które nie (FALSE). Zaznacz znakiem X odpowiednią rubrykę w tabeli.
Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz 1 punkt.

TRANSKRYPCJA

Statistics show that only 12% of all journeys made are by public transport. Around six times as many are made by car. Unfortunately, the poor performance and  questionable safety of British public transport has brought passenger figures down, and is forcing more and more travellers into cars. But, as anyone who has experienced the motorways recently will agree, this isn’t always a quick and easy alternative.

About a quarter of all main roads in Britain are jammed for at least an hour a day – compared to our neighbours in Germany and France, where that figure is less than 10%. In
fact, a car journey on the motorway from London to Manchester, that’s less than 200 miles, frequently takes as long as seven hours. That’s an average speed of less than 30mph on roads with a maximum of 70mph. A fit cyclist, accustomed to lengthy periods in the saddle, could get there quicker.

Of course, it isn’t just the increased number of car owners that are choking our motorways – there are more trucks out there too. However, it’s wise to be careful when
apportioning the blame – after all the motorways were originally built for freight.

In 1994, a law was passed that all trucks over seven and a half tonnes had to be mechanically restricted to 56mph. This safety measure transformed British motorways overnight, and not necessarily for the better.

Before the legislation was passed, there were always faster lorries and slower ones, so they were evenly spread along the length of the motorway. Now all lorries travel at the same speed, give or take a few miles per hour. As a consequence, they now bunch together in long lines travelling nose-to-tail, which has a devastating effect on the flow of traffic.

In Germany, trucks over seven and a half tonnes are confined to the inside lane during peak hours and restricted from overtaking. Unlike in Britain, in many European countries trucks are also banned from driving on Sundays and public holidays. Also, more goods are transported by rail and even barges.

Perhaps this goes some way to explain why their roads have only a fraction of the problems that ours do.

 

10.1. British people are satisfied with the quality of public transport.

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10.2. The motorways in Britain are more often jammed than those in France or Germany.

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10.3. The law introduced in 1994 improved the situation on the motorways.

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10.4. Due to legal regulations lorries in Britain travel at more or less the same pace.

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10.5. In Germany lorries are restricted to one lane during rush hours.

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10.6. Lorries are banned on British motorways on public holidays.

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Matura 2006 z języka angielskiego r 9

Matura 2006

ROZUMIENIE ZE SŁUCHU

Zadanie 9. (4 pkt)
Zapoznaj się z treścią zadania. Usłyszysz dwukrotnie zapowiedzi czterech programów telewizyjnych (9.1.-9.4.). Na podstawie usłyszanych informacji przyporządkuj jedno zdanie (A-G) do każdego programu i wpisz odpowiednie litery do tabeli. Trzy zdania podane zostały dodatkowo i nie pasują do żadnego programu. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz l punkt.

 

TRANSKRYPCJA

Zadanie 9.
…and this week we’ll be broadcasting a few documentaries really worth watching. Let me now present some of them:

ONE
For some 20 years and on stages all over the world, actress Prunella Scales has played the part of Queen Victoria in a unique one-woman show. The show is based on diaries written by Victoria herself throughout her long life.
Here, in this programme, Prunella aims to deepen our understanding of the Queen still further as she goes on a journey to discover more about the person she has played for so long. From Balmoral to the Isle of Wight, in royal palaces and private homes, Prunella meets historical experts and descendants of those who knew the Queen. What emerges is not the granite-faced and unamused monarch of legend but a more complex, more passionate and more surprising woman altogether.

TWO
About 260 years ago Bonnie Prince Charlie triggered the last land battle in Britain. In this episode father and son presenters, Peter and Dan Snow, follow his tracks as he
marched an army from Scotland all the way to Derby and was then chased back for the final confrontation on Culloden Moor. As Peter reveals with the help of cutting-edge graphics how close Prince Charles came to success, Dan goes on a night march and sees how, without the aid of modern technology, the troops of Bonnie Prince Charlie made a fatal error on the eve of the battle.

THREE
Terry Jones takes us on a tour of the Middle Ages destroying old myths and discovering extraordinary stories of real people. Were the outlaws really like Robin Hood and were the sheriffs all evil and corrupt? Terry discovers that sheriffs were actually pen pushing bureaucrats, and the greatest threat to law and order in the Middle Ages were gangs of upper crust outlaws terrorising the country for the sole purpose of getting rich quickly. But those same outlaws died heroes just like Robin Hood. As you will see, the story is not just a black and white tale of goodies and baddies.

FOUR
She has her own bodyguards and lives in Paris in a humidified, air-conditioned box protected by triplex bullet proof glass. She is Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. Alan Yentob tells the story of how the Mona Lisa came to be the most famous work of art in the world. It’s a tale full of notoriety, glamour and intrigue as the Mona Lisa is abducted, vandalised and exploited across the centuries. With the help of leading scholars and original research, Alan also finally solves the central mystery of the Mona Lisa, who she is and why she’s smiling.

abridged from: www.bbc.co.uk/bbctwo/listings

A. This is a story of a victory that was near but never came true.
B. You will find out someone’s identity.
C. You will learn how famous works of art are created.
D. A number of legends from the Middle Ages are presented in this programme.
E. This programme presents a surprising picture of a medieval society.
F. You will gain a new insight into someone’s personality.
G. This programme shows how Bonnie Prince Charlie won one of his battles.

9.1.

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9.2.

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9.3.

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9.4.

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Matura 2006 z języka angielskiego 6

Matura 2006

Zadanie 6. (7 pkt)

Przeczytaj poniższy tekst. Z podanych odpowiedzi wybierz właściwą, zgodną z treścią tekstu. Zaznacz jedną z czterech możliwości, zakreślając literę A, B, C lub D. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz 1 punkt.

On May 17, 2157, Margie wrote in her diary, “Today Tommy found a real book!” It was a very old book. Margie’s grandfather once said that when he was a little boy his grandfather told him that there was a time when all stories were printed on paper. They turned the pages, which were yellow, and it was awfully funny to read words that didn’t move the way they were supposed to – on screen, you know. And then, when they turned back to the page before, it had the same words on it that it had had when they read it the first time.
She said, “What is it about?”
“School.”
Margie was cynical. “School? What’s there to write about school? I hate school.” The mechanical teacher had been giving her test after test in geography and she had been doing worse and worse until her mother sent for the County Inspector. Margie had hoped the man wouldn’t know how to fix the teacher, but he knew all right, and after an hour or so, there it was again, large and black and ugly, with a big screen on which all the lessons were shown and the questions were asked. But the worst thing of all were the test papers and homework tasks she had to submit regularly.
So she said to Tommy, “Why would anyone write about school?”
“Because it’s not our kind of school, stupid. This is the old kind of school that they had hundreds of years ago.”
Margie was hurt. “Well, I don’t know what kind of school they had all that time ago.”
She read the book over his shoulder for a while, then said, “Anyway, they had a teacher.”
“Sure they had a teacher, but it wasn’t a regular teacher. It was a man.”
“I wouldn’t want a strange man in my house to teach me.”
Tommy screamed with laughter. “You don’t know much, Margie. The teachers didn’t live in the house. They had a special building and all the kids went there.”
“And all the kids learned the same thing?”
“Sure, if they were the same age.”
“But a teacher has to fit the mind of each boy and girl it teaches and each kid has to be taught differently.”
They weren’t even half-finished when Margie’s mother called, “Margie! School!” Margie went into the schoolroom. It was right next to her bedroom, and the mechanical teacher was on and waiting for her. It was always on at the same time every day except Saturday and Sunday.
The screen was lit up and it said: “Please insert yesterday’s arithmetic homework.”
Margie did so thinking about the old schools. All the kids from the whole neighbourhood came, laughing and shouting in the schoolyard, sitting together in the schoolroom, going home together at the end of the day. They learned the same things, so they could help one another with their homework and talk about it.
And the teachers were people … Margie was thinking about how the kids must have loved it in the old days. She was thinking about the fun they had.

adapted from: The Fun They Had by Isaac Asimov

6.1. “A real book” in the story was a book
A. based on a true story.
B. Margie got from her grandfather.
C. written by Margie.
D. printed on paper.

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6.2. While reading, the children were amused because
A. the book had yellow pages.
B. they had to turn the pages.
C. the words stayed in the same place.
D. they had to read the same page twice.

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6.3. What did Margie hate most?
A. Tests and homework.
B. Her ugly teacher.
C. The questions on the screen.
D. Getting bad marks.

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6.4. The difference between Margie’s school and the school centuries ago was in the
A. number of tests the children were given.
B. subjects the children were taught.
C. age when the children went to school.
D. place where the children had their lessons.

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6.5. In her school Margie missed
A. the regular hours of lessons.
B. the company of other children.
C. individual lessons with her teacher.
D. textbooks printed on paper.

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6.6. The writer wants to show us that
A. today’s schools are much worse than future schools.
B. today’s children should be happy about present schools.
C. teaching and learning won’t change much in the future.
D. the computer is a better teacher than a man.

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6.7. The text is part of
A. a fairy tale.
B. a fantasy book.
C. a science fiction story.
D. a historical novel.

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Matura 2006 z języka angielskiego 4-5

Matura 2006

ROZUMIENIE TEKSTU CZYTANEGO

Zadanie 4. (6 pkt)

Przeczytaj informacje dotyczące czterech propozycji spędzenia czasu wolnego. Przyporządkuj do każdego zdania (4.1.-4.6.) jedną z opisanych imprez (A-D). (Wpisz odpowiednią literę w każdą rubrykę tabeli.) Każda z liter może być użyta więcej niż raz. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz 1 punkt.

A. Easter Fun Days 20-21 April
A fun day out for the whole family. Easter egg hunt, donkey rides, children’s entertainment, personal contact with friendly farm animals, refreshments and a miniature steam train. Times: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Admission: Adult: ₤4.50 Child: ₤2.50 Family: ₤12.00

B. Easter Flowers 20-21 April
Come and enjoy the amazing display of lilies and other seasonal flowers, then try some homemade cakes and tea. Times: 2 p.m. – 4.30 p.m. Admission: FREE

C. Wildlife Walk 3 May
Leisurely paced walk of approximately 2 miles at a superb nature reserve to raise money for the protection of endangered animal species. Must be booked in advance. Please call 01621 000111 Times: 10 a.m. Admission: ₤3.50

D. Bird Chorus 3 May
Join us in Chalkney Wood to experience bird song at its best and identify the birds that sing in the early morning chorus. Followed by a light breakfast in a nearby inn. Times: 4.30 a.m. – 7.00 a.m. Admission: ₤3.00

adapted from: Essex Festival of the Countryside 2003, Essex County Council

4.1. You will listen to something.

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4.2. You don’t have to pay for the event.

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4.3. You can see and touch different animals.

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4.4. You have to phone us before you take part in the event.

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4.5. You have to get up very early to take part in it.

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4.6. You won’t get anything to eat or drink.

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Zadanie 5. (7 pkt)

Przeczytaj poniższy tekst. Na podstawie informacji w nim zawartych zdecyduj, które zdania są zgodne z treścią tekstu (TRUE), a które nie (FALSE). (Zaznacz znakiem X odpowiednią rubrykę w tabeli.) Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz 1 punkt.

Do you know the famous twins, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen? Their life in show business began when they were babies. Their father suggested that
a Hollywood television studio use them to play the part of Michelle, a little girl in a series called Full House. There are strict rules saying how many hours a child can actually work in film or television. That is why many studios use identical twins when they film a small child in a story. The Full House series ran until the girls were eight years old.
By the time they were four, a businessman who had managed pop groups such as Ace of Base and Roxette had the clever idea of licensing the twins as a “brand”. He set up a company which rents out the twins’ image to clothes and toy companies. So what exactly is the “Olsen image”? They have become known as the “un-Britneys”. This means that they provide a safe model for girls between six and thirteen who find Britney Spears too provocative.

The twins take a keen interest in all of the products sold in the “Mary-Kate and Ashley” range, and they veto things they don’t like. They have sold 35 million copies of their videos, released over 17 pop albums and written many teenage novels. They now have a new sitcom called So Little Time, plus their own magazine and website.

At the same time they try to live the normal lives of typical American teenagers. Each day the girls go to their small private school where they wear school uniforms and study hard. They do their homework each night stopping to watch their favourite TV programmes. At weekends they go riding or attend dance classes.
In America there is a strong youngsters’ movement against drinking alcohol, smoking and having sex before marriage. And the Olsens represent what is pure and good. At the same time, they are successful and attractive, and this may encourage many more girls to follow their example.

adapted from: Current, November/December 2002

5.1. The Olsen twins have been in show business all their lives.

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5.2. It is unusual for film studios to employ twins for the same role.

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5.3. It was their father’s idea to create the “Olsen image”.

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5.4. The twins’ image is the opposite of Britney Spears’ image.

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5.5. The girls give opinions about their brand products.

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5.6. They are too busy to do the things ordinary teenagers do.

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5.7. The author of the text gives advice on how teenagers can become film stars.

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Matura 2006 z języka angielskiego 1-3

Matura 2006

ROZUMIENIE ZE SŁUCHU

Zadanie 1. (5 pkt)

Zapoznaj się z treścią zadania. Usłyszysz dwukrotnie pięć krótkich rozmów (1.1.-1.5.). Przyporządkuj każdej z nich miejsce, w którym się ona odbywa (A–F). Wpisz odpowiednie litery do tabeli. Jedno miejsce zostało podane dodatkowo i nie pasuje do żadnej rozmowy. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz 1 punkt.

TRANSKRYPCJA
[spoiler]

Zadanie 1.

Dialogue one
Speaker one: Am I OK for Leicester Square?
Speaker two: No, you’ll have to jump out at the park and get a 12 there.
Speaker one: Could you tell me when we get there?
Speaker two: It’s quite a way yet, but I’ll tell you in good time. Pay the fare and take a seat, please.
Speaker one: How much is that?

Dialogue two
Speaker one: Ah, yes, you’re Brian Preston?
Speaker two: That’s right.
Speaker one: You’ve brought some clothes and things with you, I see.
Speaker two: Yes, I think I’ll probably be here for a few days at least, until all the tests are done.
Speaker one: I’m afraid you’ll have to wait a moment as your bed is not ready yet. The last patient only left an hour ago.
Speaker two: That’s OK. I don’t mind.

Dialogue three
Speaker one: Are we getting off at the next station?
Speaker two: No, two stops to go.
Speaker one: Then we’ve got some time to go to the buffet car. I could do with a cup of coffee.
Speaker two: OK.
Speaker one: Do you know where it is?
Speaker two: I guess somewhere at the back.
Speaker one: Let’s ask the ticket collector.

Dialogue four
Speaker one: What’s the trouble?
Speaker two: I was sick most of the night. I think it’s something I ate. We ate at that new restaurant last night.
Speaker one: Was it that new restaurant in Birch Street?
Speaker two: As a matter of fact it was. Why do you ask?
Speaker one: Because, one of my patients ate there last week and he had the same kind of problem.
Speaker two: Sounds strange, doesn’t it? Anyway, what shall I take?
Speaker one: For the time being just drink plenty of water and if you don’t get any better tomorrow you’ll have to undergo some tests in hospital.

Dialogue five
Speaker one: If you’d like to follow me, I’ll show you your room.
Speaker two: That’s lovely, thank you.
Speaker one: The bathroom is just up here, right next to your room and there is a telephone beside your bed. How long will you be staying with us?
Speaker two: Until Monday.
Speaker one: Fine. I’ll bring you the registration form to fill in.

adapted from: BBC Essential English Guide to Britain, Talking English by Dean Curry, Situational Dialogues by Michael Ockenden

[/spoiler]

A. in a hotel

B. in a doctor’s surgery

C. in a hospital

D. in a restaurant

E. on a bus

F. on a train

Rozmowa 1.1 odbywa się:

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Rozmowa 1.2 odbywa się:

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Rozmowa 1.3 odbywa się:

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Rozmowa 1.4 odbywa się:

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Rozmowa 1.5 odbywa się:

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Zadanie 2. (5 pkt)

Zapoznaj się z treścią zadania. Usłyszysz dwukrotnie komunikat radiowy o konkursie językowym. Na podstawie usłyszanych informacji zdecyduj, które zdania są zgodne z treścią tekstu (TRUE), a które nie (FALSE). Zaznacz znakiem X odpowiednią rubrykę w tabeli. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz 1 punkt.

TRANSKRYPCJA
[spoiler]

Zadanie 2.

Explore Britain and perfect your English at the same time. BBC English Magazine and the Association of English Language Schools are offering superb prizes to the winners of our competition.

The first prize is a two-week English course in Britain including flights and host family accommodation. The winner can choose from 13 participating schools located all over Britain – some in the heart of the countryside or on the coast; others in university towns or in the capital. There will also be 12 second prizes of a two-week course with accommodation at the remaining schools. All courses will include no fewer than 20 lessons a week.

The competition is open to all readers of BBC English Magazine who are aged over 16, but if you are under 18, you must obtain your parents’ permission. To enter this challenging competition, you will need to read the articles very carefully and answer a series of detailed questions which will be published in our magazine in May, June and July. Then, we will ask you to send your answers with the coupons that appear in the above issues. You can check your answers in the August issue and the list of winners will be published in November.

Tell your friends about our competition and do not miss your copy of BBC English Magazine.

adapted from: BBC English, June 1996
[/spoiler]

2.1. There are two sponsors of the competition.

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2.2. The winner of the first prize can choose any school in Britain.

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2.3. You must be at least 18 years old to take part in the competition.

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2.4. The questions in the competition will check if the readers understand the texts.

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2.5. The right answers will be published in the November issue of BBC English Magazine.

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Zadanie 3. (5 pkt)

Zapoznaj się z treścią zadania. Usłyszysz dwukrotnie wypowiedź nastolatki. Z podanych możliwości odpowiedzi wybierz właściwą, zgodną z treścią tekstu. Zakreśl literę A, B lub C. Za każdą poprawną odpowiedź otrzymasz 1 punkt.

TRANSKRYPCJA
[spoiler]

Zadanie 3.

My family are travellers. We have a van and a caravan and we drive around from place to place, usually with about a dozen other people. We think the world’s too big to stay in just one place.

We’ve lived all over. Sometimes we camp and stay for a few days, other times we might stay a couple of months. It depends how friendly the area and the people are. A lot of towns have special sites set up for travellers, with proper toilets and showers, but other places make it quite difficult to camp. We’ve had people shouting at us, throwing stones, or breaking our things… They call us gypsies or robbers, but we’re not – we just like to travel.

If we’re going to be in one place for a while, I go to the local school. That can be really tough. The kids, when I walk past, hold on to their bags. I think they’re scared I’m going to steal from them. It’s impossible to make friends. I’m never around for long enough, and even if I was, nobody would speak to me.

We enjoy moving around, seeing different parts of the country, and I think it’s great being able to choose a nice spot and to set up there, and we’ve even gone across to France. If we stop in a place that turns out to be horrible, we just move on, whereas some people have to stay in those towns forever.

However, I miss belonging somewhere. I mean I belong with my family and with the other travellers, but sometimes, that isn’t enough… I want to belong with a group of friends, with girls my own age. I don’t know if that will ever happen…

adapted from: Shout, No. 247
[/spoiler]

3.1. The girl’s family are travellers because they
A. have a van and a caravan to drive around.
B. believe there is so much to see in the world.
C. can’t find a house that is big enough.

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3.2. They camp in one place for a longer time if
A. there are no gypsies around.
B. there is a school nearby.
C. the local people are kind to them.

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3.3. At school the girl can’t make friends because
A. the children don’t trust her.
B. she is scared of other kids.
C. she doesn’t want to speak to others.

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3.4. The family enjoy their way of life because they
A. don’t have to stay in a place they don’t like.
B. can often go to other countries.
C. can stay with the other travellers.

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3.5. The girl
A. tells the story of her tragic childhood.
B. presents her opinion about being a traveller.
C. describes a typical day of her family.

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